Container Home Build in the great state of SC

**this post is being updated. thank you for your patience.**

I have always been interested in shipping container homes.  I’ve always dug the small tiny niche spaces I’ve learned to live in during my worldly travels. Shipping container seem to always do it or me no matter what the lay out format used. So in November 2015, upon the return to America, I took it upon myself to start several projects which would not only to give myself a place to live, but also to advance my skills and knowledge of design, carpentry, farming, and being an adult. City life is not what it’s all cracked up to be no matter how many cunts express in on Face book. 

I manage to acquire a small parcel of land back in 2007 which already housed 3 40+ year aging wooden structures.  Finding various ways to reused, to recycle them has been an exciting task.  The main structure is a large 60X40 A-frame roof complex, which has been very important to my progress for it has given me shield from the coastal elements. A 1970 mobile home sat in the way of my newly prepared plans, and after doing a bit of homework…… I then concluded on what to do with it.

First it required me to break a few foolish old school SC laws. It was interesting to find out that prefab mobile homes are a shitty one-way product ever to be produced in America.  There is nothing out there in the rule and regulations in the industry of America that states how to properly dispose of them. I mean there is a time that those eyesores become even bigger of a neighborhood problems when people have no choice but to abandon them on the property they were installed. Nothing out there developed by humans specifies in any ways to recycles those horrible ugly manufactured homes. Once they reach a certain age on a parcel of land, the must remain there FOREVER!

What a bunch of wasteful human bullshit!

I so happened to know a few good ol farming buddies that needed some form of housing/shelter for their hunting property which a home in this condition was the trick! They came in with their John Deere tractor and made haste across the tracks with the mobile home.

LUCKY ME!!!!  My project can now begin.  

I did a bit of homework, after some time made the decision to purchase 2 20 foot containers that were 12 years old, located in Savannah, GA. All because they were cheap and would git into my budget.  The moment they arrived, I understood the value in purchasing a higher quality, (one way), newer model container. Tho I’m in it for something to do, something to occupy my time for a couple of years….. but when placing certain project in a bottom line price business concept, Money vs Time; Ha! 12 year old container is way out of the question….. C’MON!! common sense when building for a picky group of people.

I banged out the walls, pushed back the ceilings, grind the rust, cut my windows & doors, painted all the new for the first month or so in preparation work. A lot of time went in before I could begin on the framing.

Wood work! That’s another interesting story for I’m using new cuts as well as recycling lumber from a barn that dates back over one hundred years ago when the village that I’m building in was a hustling bustling train stop. Once again at that moment I understood the value in purchasing a higher quality, fresh cut lumber. Tho I’m in it for something to do which means my walls are bowed, my shelfs are not straight, there is not a straight square in the entire containers.

Be that as it may,  as I am near completion of c container two, it’s personality is beginning to develop.

And I like it!

Plenty of trial and error went into the making of this home.  Not to worry… Other then my ego, and a few cuts in the skin.. No containers were harmed in the making of this home.

I am no carpenter, I just do!

**this post is being updated. thank you for your patience.**

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